Science Friday Features Candid Creatures

UPDATE: Roland Kays also appeared on Science Friday’s radio program on May 6, 2016, reaching 1.5 million listeners on 374 public radio stations!

Today, NPR’s Science Friday posted an awesome article about our client’s book Candid Creatures. Here’s an excerpt from Julie Leibach’s clever piece. Be sure to check out her entire post for more, including a selection of our amazing photos:
CandidCreaturesCover“A new book of unabashed selfies has been released, but it reveals neither hide nor hair of a Kardashian. There is, however, plenty of hide and hair. Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature, by zoologist Roland Kays, is an album of wildlife photos captured with camera traps—devices that researchers install in the field to record members of the animal kingdom as they lope, scamper, or climb about their business. Kays’ book is also a rich summary of the insights that scientists have gained from using these tools.

“In essence, modern camera traps work like this: When a warm-blooded animal (or a reptile heated by the sun) walks in front of the device, an infrared motion-sensing component detects a change in heat signature, which triggers a digital camera to snap a photo. It’s then up to the researchers to recover the memory card containing the footage.

2.6.05Day-cougar“It’s kinda like Christmas every time you open the camera trap and get to see what pictures you get,” says Kays, a research associate professor at North Carolina State University and the director of the Biodiversity Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, who often uses camera traps in his work.

“Of course, there are millions of crappy pictures of animal butts,” he concedes, but when you hit upon a great shot of, say, a coyote in the middle of a frame, “you’re like, ah, that’s cool.” For Candid Creatures, Kays compiled what he calls the “greatest hits” of global camera trapping efforts, consisting of more than 600 photos from 153 research groups, including his own.”

This prestigious placement is part of our comprehensive book publicity campaign, which includes a Radio Media Tour, for Johns Hopkins University Press. Please contact Kathlene Carney to discuss how Carney & Associates publicity services can help promote your science or nature book or organization.

 

 

 

Green Sex for Climate’s Sake

Radio Ecoshock is an awesome, long-running environmental  radio show that airs on more than 91 stations in the U.S. and Canada, plus podcasts and through their website which receives more than 31,000 downloads per month.

AlishaGravesAlex Smith, the show’s outstanding host, interviewed our expert Alisha Graves last week. Alisha is co-founder of The OASIS Initiative: 
A project of University of California, Berkeley, an effort to forestall rapid population growth and extreme poverty in the Sahel region of Africa. Alisha also serves as Vice President of the Population Program at Venture Strategies for Health and Development, a California-based non-profit organization, where she oversees the “Rebirth of Population Awareness” initiative. And she is a research fellow for Project Drawdown, analyzing the potential contribution of family planning for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Our pitch had a provocative title,Green Sex for Climate’s Sake,” and the show was equally intriguing. Here’s an excerpt from Alex’s description on his site:

“‘Green sex’ – Do it for the climate. We’ll find out what that means with Alisha Graves. The old saying about the circus: ‘There’s a sucker born every minute.’ But hundreds of new humans are born every minute, as the human population continues to multiply. Many will be Western-style super consumers, the ones who drain resources and fill the skies with greenhouse gases. If we can’t control that urge, a major climate disruption may do it for us.

“To hear some environmental groups tell it, all we have to do is install solar energy and drive electric cars – problem solved. But can we really tackle the climate issue without talking about population?

“Our instant mental defense is to tell ourselves it’s those billions of peasants ‘over there’ somewhere who are responsible for the population impact. What’s wrong with that idea? Think of it this way: if you decide not to have a child, you have done far more to reduce greenhouse gases than buying an electric car or installing solar panels. That is because every new consumer born is a heat engine.

“Sex is such a powerful urge. It can drive our lives even when our brains are barely involved, maybe especially when our brains are weak. Do you believe that rational debate can change sexual behavior? It’s interesting to discover that half the babies born in the United States were unintended. So fifty percent of the time, there was no conversation like “should we do this?” Meanwhile, states like Texas are making it harder and harder for a woman to access a safe and legal abortion. At times I’m sure we are going backward in population control, not forward.”

You or anyone can listen to or download just this 23 minute interview with Alisha Graves using these permanent links (in either CD Quality, or the faster loading but lower quality Lo-Fi)

This was one of many media placements we secured during this Radio Media Tour.  Please contact Kathlene Carney to discuss how Carney & Associates publicity services can help promote your environmental organization.

Bay Nature Cover Story

BayNatureCoverThe April-June 2016  issue of Bay Nature magazine features our client’s book The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling  on the cover!

The author, John Muir Laws, is a renowned naturalist, educator, and artist. Called a modern day Audubon by the Washington Post, Laws’ nature guides are highly respected among scientists and nature lovers alike.

The Bay Nature cover story features an excerpt and drawings from this newest Laws Guide. Here’s a sample:

“Writers, naturalists, and scientists in all disciplines use journals to preserve what they have seen, done, and thought in the course of their work. My journal is the most important tool I carry into the field with me—it is even more necessary than my binoculars. Journaling is a skill for anyone who wishes to live life more deeply, a skill that you can learn at any age and that will develop with intention and practice. Sketching and writing as you explore is the most effective thing you can do to launch yourself in the process of discovery.

“Keeping a nature journal is a way to rediscover the thrill of science. Observing and journaling will slow you down and make you stop, sit down, look, and look again. How often do we take the time to be still, quiet, and attentive? Engaging in this process helps you to organize your thoughts, piece together answers, and ask richer questions. Once you slow down and look long enough to record observations in your journal, mysteries will unfold before you. At the core of all science are insatiable curiosity and deep observation, qualities that lead to the best kind of learning: learning motivated by your intrinsic wonder, hunger to understand, and ability to observe.

“I draw and work in my nature journal for three reasons: to see, to remember, and to stimulate curiosity. These abilities will be reinforced for you, too, every time you sit down to journal—and you don’t have to be good at drawing. The benefit of journaling is not limited to what you produce on the page; it is, rather, found in your experience and how you think along the way.

“In any moment, it is possible to learn about your surroundings through observation. It is also easy to walk through the world caught up in your own thoughts and worries, looking without truly seeing. The difference between these two experiences is conscious, focused attention. Inspired by Kerry Ruef’s Private Eye Project, I use three prompts—“I notice,” “I wonder,” and “It reminds me of ”—as the foundation of my practice because they lead to conscious attention.”

This prestigious cover placement is part of our comprehensive book publicity campaign for Heyday publishers. Please contact Kathlene Carney to discuss how Carney & Associates publicity services can help promote your science or nature book or organization.

The New York Times features “Candid Creatures”

Our client’s book Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature by biologist Roland Kays (Johns Hopkins University Press) was featured The New York Times! Science reporter Nicholas St. Fleurs interviewed Kays for spread on camera traps. He also included several photos from this groundbreaking book, which is the first ever to compile the remarkable images and discoveries made through this explosive new technology. Here are some excerpts:

CandidCreaturesCover“Camera traps can help illuminate the world’s most elusive animals. When a cougar, elephant or other creature triggers the device’s motion sensor, it snaps a picture.
“’Most animals are hiding, you actually never get to see them and you might be led to believe there’s nothing out there,’ said Roland Kays, a zoologist at North Carolina State University and author of the forthcoming book Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature.
“Wildlife photographers have used remote-controlled cameras for more than a century, but in recent years scientists have begun using the tool with more frequency, Dr. Kays said. The images may be used to help researchers track the whereabouts of rare species or figure out what creatures inhabit a certain area.

“Volunteers with the citizen science project eMammal set up the camera trap that captured
this coyote in the South Mountains Game Lands in North Carolina. The project encourages wildlife enthusiasts to assemble camera traps in their backyards in hopes of connecting with the furry creatures that live around them. This particular project was observing the effects of hunting and hiking on wildlife near Raleigh, N.C.

“We’ve been finding coyotes in Raleigh in much more urban areas that we thought,” said Dr. Kays, the zoologist at North Carolina State University who started the eMammal project.
NYT Article“Sometimes what you find is quite surprising,” Dr. Kays said. In one case middle school students in India caught video footage of a tiger exhaling a steamy breath. They were participating in an eMammal project that organized a trap-cam photo exchange among classrooms in India, Mexico and North Carolina.

“Children from India shared images of tigers, leopards and civets, while students from Mexico shared their pictures of jaguarundi, ocelots and ring-tailed ground squirrels. Those from North Carolina shared images of coyotes, gray foxes and white-tailed deer.

28TB-CamTrap1-jumbo“’It allowed the kids to learn about the animals that are living right around them that they otherwise never see,’ Dr. Kays said. “And through the joy of sharing their own discoveries, they can compare how the species are different and similar.”

This prestigious national placement is part of our comprehensive book publicity campaign for Johns Hopkins University Press. Please contact Kathlene Carney to discuss how Carney & Associates publicity services can help promote your science or nature book or organization.