All-Electric America: A Climate Solution and the Hopeful Future

PORTLAND, OR . . . A host of modern-day Edisons have invented technology that can now power all of our energy needs with electricity generated completely by renewable energy. So what’s the hold up? At this point, waiting to go electric is like saying we shouldn’t have used the personal computer in 1985 until the smartphone was invented. It is time for the utility industry, politicians, and consumers to wake up to the opportunity that this energy transformation will provide.

bookpublicityIn All-Electric America: A Climate Solution and the Hopeful Future, authors S. David Freeman, former utility CEO, and Leah Y Parks, a journalist in the electricity industry, present a practical course of action offering the best hope for eliminating disastrous climate change. With fascinating insight, these experts evaluate the latest research, technology, and energy policies, and lay out a comprehensive plan with achievable goals and a clear timeline.

Along the way, Freeman and Parks debunk common misconceptions about renewable energy:

It’s too expensive!”
Renewable energy is actually cheaper than fossil fuels.

“It’s not practical!”
Renewable energy sources are superabundant and can be distributed in massive quantities.

“We don’t have the technology!”
Current tech can meet all our energy needs many times over with solar and wind sources alone.

Not only is renewable energy better for the environment, it’s cheaper, more sustainable, more price stable, and safer than our current sources. Our country is poised for a twenty-first century energy revolution, and All-Electric America shows us how to do it.

David Freeman is a leading authority on energy policy. He was appointed by President Jimmy Carter as head of Tennessee Valley Authority, one of the nations largest electric utilities. After 7 years at TVA, he spent 30 years as the CEO of major public utilities in Texas, California, and New York. He then served as Deputy Mayor of Los Angeles for Energy and the Environment. He is currently a senior advisor to Friends of the Earth and has authored three books on energy including, “A Time to Choose.”

Leah Y Parks is an associate editor for ElectricityPolicy.com and Electricity Daily, a journal and daily newsletter that examine current events and the state of the electricity industry for utility executives, commissioners, regulators, and other experts in the field. She is also a freelance writer, has acted as an advisor for technology reports, and has written extensively about innovations in energy storage, smart grid technology, energy infrastructure, and renewable energy.

At Carney & Associates, we specialize in providing publicity services for authors and experts who improve our world. To find out how we can provide PR services for your book, product or organization, please contact publicist Kathlene Carney.

Trumped and Stumped: Review of I’m Right and You’re an Idiot

Many thanks to Erik Curren for his thoughtful review of I’m Right and You’re an Idiot: The Toxic State of Public Discourse and How to Clean It Up by James Hoggan on Curren’s site Transition Voice.

Trumped and Stumped: A Cure for Political Polarization?

Curren notes the book “sounds like it was written just for the 2016 US presidential race” and it says “a lot about the polarization in American politics that has grown over the last forty years and made this year’s presidential race both incredibly nasty and totally absurd.”

Hoggan interviewed more than 60 leading thinkers including Thich Nhat Hanh, Peter Senge, and the Dalai Lama for the book, as Curren says, “all famous smart people who obviously have lots to say about how angry people can get along with each other better in politics.”

In his review, Curren  highlights the work of Adam Kahane, using power and love for social change. “…perhaps my favorite chapter comes from a peacemaker I hadn’t heard of before. During a stint with the oil company Shell, Canadian facilitator Adam Kahane learned the art of scenario planning. He then took this brand of practical storytelling on the road as a consultant to help people in more than 50 countries stop yelling at each other and start working together.”

It’s a fascinating read, see more here.

At Carney & Associates, we specialize in providing publicity services for authors and experts who improve our world. To find out how we can help spread the word of your book, product or organization, please contact Kathlene Carney.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildlife Photographer Of The Year 2016 Finalists

The 52nd annual ‘Wildlife Photographer of the Year’ (WPY) competition has recently released a preview of this year’s finalists. A killer whale feeding on herring beneath a fishing boat, a hungry hornbill eating a termite, mayflies swarming around under a starry night sky, are among the spectacular images that stood out for judges as the very best wildlife photograhy.

It all started in 1965. There were about 500 entries back then, but now, more than fifty years later, it attracted almost 50,000 of them from professionals and amateurs from 95 countries. The WPY52 exhibition will be on display from the 21st of October at Natural History Museum, London. Here are a few of my favorites:

NatureBookPublicity
Splitting the catch © Audun Rikardsen, taken in Norway

Sometimes it’s the fishing boats that look for killer whales and humpbacks, hoping to locate the shoals of herring that migrate to these Arctic Norwegian waters. But the whales have also recently started to follow these boats. This image by Auden Rikardsen shows a large male killer whale feeding on herring that have been squeezed out of the boat’s closing fishing net.

Thistle-plucker: By Isaac Aylward, of the UK.
Thistle-plucker: By Isaac Aylward, of the UK.

Try keeping a flying linnet in sight while scrambling down rocky embankments holding a telephoto lens. Isaac did, for 20 minutes. He was determined to keep pace with the linnet, which he spotted while hiking in Bulgaria’s Rila Mountains, finally catching up with the tiny bird when it settled to feed on a thistle flowerhead.

Swarming under the stars: By Imre Potyó, of Hungary.

After a few decades, the Danube mayfly (Ephoron virgo) have returned to the river Danube, probably due to the increasing water quality. The photographer said: ‘The fantastic mass swarming of these mayflies is one of the most exciting phenomenon for me. My image was taken in a dark, near-natural bank on a tributary of the Danube with long exposure, flash and flashlight. Unfortunately, the lamp-lit bridges have negative influence to them, because they are attracted to the lamps, become exhausted, lay their eggs to the asphalt roads of the bridge and perish immediately. The team of the Danube Research Institute in cooperation with the Environmental Optics Laboratory plan to solve this biooptical and environmental problem. This image is very precious to me as I can draw the attention to these spectacular water insects and their complex ecological light trap.’

Termite tossing: By Willem Kruger, from South Africa.
Termite tossing: By Willem Kruger, from South Africa.

Termite after termite after termite – using the tip of its massive beak-like forceps to pick them up, the hornbill flicks them in the air and then swallows them. Foraging beside a track in South Africa’s semi-arid Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, the southern yellow-billed hornbill was deeply absorbed in snacking.

To see the entire list of 2016 finalists, please visit the Daily Mail.

At Carney & Associates, we specialize in providing publicity services for nature and wildlife books, experts and nonprofit organizations. To find out how we can help spread the word of your book, product or organization, please contact Kathlene Carney.