Daily Beast Features Candid Creatures

The Daily Beast featured an entertaining gallery of funny camera trap photos from our client’s blockbuster book Candid Creatures last week:

“Humans aren’t the only narcissistic selfie-loving animals, turns out much of the animal kingdom enjoys a good portrait. Biologist Roland Kays assembled hundreds of candid photographs of animals from across in the globe in the wild from scientists and conservation projects in a new book, Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature. “Kays reveals how scientists have used camera traps to indentify problems, as well as solutions, so that humans and wild animals can coexsist,” the book states. Aside from its conservation usefulness, the photos have undeniable humor and interspecies friendships.”

Credit: BENOIT GOOSSENS
Credit: BENOIT GOOSSENS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature by Roland Kays is published by Johns Hopkins University Press.

This placement is one of many in our national book publicity campaign for this title. To find out how our publicity services can help spread the word of your book, product or organization, please contact Kathlene Carney at Carney & Associates.

News & Observer features Candid Creatures

Photo: A chimpanzee reaches out to touch the camera trap and triggers its motion sensor, taking an apparent selfie. Credit: Badru Mugerwa/ITFC/TEAM Network

RolandKays
Zoologist Roland Kays

The News & Observer ran a marvelous feature about Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature, by zoologist Roland Kays (Johns Hopkins University Press) in advance of the Kays’ upcoming author book signing event scheduled for August 16 at Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh, NC.

Correspondent Corbie Hill wrote, “Observing animals in the wild can be tricky; if you can see them, chances are they can see you. Or smell you. Or hear you. Many times, they know you’re coming and vanish. For biologists, this is a big deal. Even if animals get used to you and go back to their business, are they still behaving as they would if no one was there? One solution is camera traps, which are the focus of local zoologist Roland Kays’ new book…” Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/entertainment/books/article94338262.html

This placement is one of many in our book publicity campaign for this title. To find out how our publicity services can help spread the word of your book, product or organization, please contact Kathlene Carney at Carney & Associates.

Science Friday Features Candid Creatures

UPDATE: Roland Kays also appeared on Science Friday’s radio program on May 6, 2016, reaching 1.5 million listeners on 374 public radio stations!

Today, NPR’s Science Friday posted an awesome article about our client’s book Candid Creatures. Here’s an excerpt from Julie Leibach’s clever piece. Be sure to check out her entire post for more, including a selection of our amazing photos:
CandidCreaturesCover“A new book of unabashed selfies has been released, but it reveals neither hide nor hair of a Kardashian. There is, however, plenty of hide and hair. Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature, by zoologist Roland Kays, is an album of wildlife photos captured with camera traps—devices that researchers install in the field to record members of the animal kingdom as they lope, scamper, or climb about their business. Kays’ book is also a rich summary of the insights that scientists have gained from using these tools.

“In essence, modern camera traps work like this: When a warm-blooded animal (or a reptile heated by the sun) walks in front of the device, an infrared motion-sensing component detects a change in heat signature, which triggers a digital camera to snap a photo. It’s then up to the researchers to recover the memory card containing the footage.

2.6.05Day-cougar“It’s kinda like Christmas every time you open the camera trap and get to see what pictures you get,” says Kays, a research associate professor at North Carolina State University and the director of the Biodiversity Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, who often uses camera traps in his work.

“Of course, there are millions of crappy pictures of animal butts,” he concedes, but when you hit upon a great shot of, say, a coyote in the middle of a frame, “you’re like, ah, that’s cool.” For Candid Creatures, Kays compiled what he calls the “greatest hits” of global camera trapping efforts, consisting of more than 600 photos from 153 research groups, including his own.”

This prestigious placement is part of our comprehensive book publicity campaign, which includes a Radio Media Tour, for Johns Hopkins University Press. Please contact Kathlene Carney to discuss how Carney & Associates publicity services can help promote your science or nature book or organization.