Prairie Public Radio Talks Food Waste with Baylen Linnekin

Food lawyer and scholar Baylen J. Linnekin was recently a guest on Prairie Public Radio‘s popular afternoon show Main Street, to discuss his well-researched, investigative book “Biting the Hands that Feed Us: How Fewer, Smarter Laws Would Make Our Food System More Sustainable,” published by Island Press.

Baylen astonished listeners with stories about ridiculous laws that not only defy common sense but are downright perverse, including:

baylenlinnekin• Constraints on the sale of “ugly” fruits and vegetables
• Preventing sharing food with the homeless and others in need
• Threatening to treat manure-the lifeblood of organic fertilization-as a toxin
• Mandating food preparers wear latex gloves which actually makes food less safe
• Prohibiting people from growing fruits and vegetables in their own yards
• Disappearing fish stocks
• Inhumane livestock conditions
• And others contributing to nearly 40% of all food going to waste.

Prairie Public Broadcasting is an NPR affiliate based in Fargo, ND and serving North Dakota and NW Minnesota.  Main Street focuses on issues, people and events important to the prairie regions of the U.S. It doesn’t focus on just regional issues but all sorts of things that are important to people on the prairie. The discussions take place from the viewpoint of people who live there.

Island Press is a nonprofit, environmental publisher based in Washington, D.C., that specializes in natural history, ecology, conservation, and the built environment.

This radio interview is one of many we regularly book as part of our Radio Media Tours for authors and experts. Do you have a compelling message you’d like to share with radio listeners? Contact Kathlene Carney to see how Carney & Associatespublicity services can help with your PR needs.

Viewpoints discusses toxic state of public discourse

Viewpoints, a public affairs show that’s syndicated to more than 500 radio stations across the U.S., recently interviewed our client James Hoggan, author of I’m Right and You’re an Idiot: The Toxic State of Public Discourse and How to Clean it Up.

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Here’s an excerpt from the show’s summary: “The presidential primaries this year underlined the sorry state of public discourse in the U.S. Name-calling, bullying, shouting and misinformation took center stage along with the candidates, and it makes you wonder if we’ll ever get back to reasoned, polite discourse on important issues during this election cycle. Our guest wondered too, and he researched the topic of toxic public discourse and why it permeates our political and social communications these days. He also provides some suggestions for advocates and candidates to get their points across without resorting to nastiness and acrimony.”

This interview is one of many on our Radio Media Tour for this title. To find out how our publicity services can help spread the word of your book, product or organization, please contact Kathlene Carney at Carney & Associates.

I’m Right and You’re An Idiot

We’re thrilled to be conducting a radio media tour for an incredibly timely book, I’m Right and You’re an Idiot: The Toxic State of Public Discourse and How to Clean it Up by leading public relations executive James Hoggan (May 24, 2016, New Society Publishers).

Public discourse on some of the most pressing problems facing society has never been more fractured. From climate change and income inequality to gun control and immigration, debate has become a toxic mix of intolerance, misinformation and deliberate distortion on both sides of the political spectrum. We are more polarized than ever on many of the issues, and the prospect of resolving them seems bleak.

For example, the poisonous rhetoric from our presidential candidates and their surrogates is a symptom of how bad the situation has become. On many issues there is simply no real debate, just vicious personal attacks designed to reinforce dogma rather than win support through persuasive logic.

How we got here and how we get out of the mess is the focus of the new book. “I wanted to find out how misinformation campaigns work, how we have come to a time when facts don’t matter and how we can start having real public conversations again,” Hoggan explains. “So I began to explore how these tendencies arise, what spurs us to become close-minded, aggressively vitriolic and most importantly, what we can do about it.”

JamesHogganJim’s a fascinating man. The Tyee recently described him thusly, “James Hoggan has been navigating the perilous waters of public conversation for 25 years as a public relations specialist. He’s built serious credibility not by being the spinniest guy in the room, but by daring to call bull on the clever but misleading techniques of many of his peers. A longtime sustainability advocate, Hoggan blew the whistle on the climate change denial lobby with his book Climate Cover-up, and launched DeSmog Blog with the stated aim of “clearing the PR pollution that clouds climate science.”

Stay tuned, we’ll be posting links to Jim’s radio interviews as the campaign progresses…

At Carney & Associates, we specialize in providing publicity services for people like James Hoggan, people who improve our world. Please contact Kathlene Carney to discuss how we can help promote your book or organization.

 

Humane Educator Featured on 60+ Radio Stations

 

Zoe Weil
Zoe Weil

Our client Zoe Weil was recently interviewed on Sea Change Radio, a nationally syndicated weekly radio show and podcast hosted by the excellent Alex Wise. Sea Change Radio, which is broadcast to over 60 stations, interviews figures who advance the world’s “shift to social, environmental, and economic sustainability.” It’s an incredible program, and we’re honored to have booked many of our clients there over the years.

Here’s Sea Change’s description of their two-part interview with Zoe:

cover_onefont“What’s the purpose of schooling? Reading, writing and ‘rithmetic, right? Well, our guest today begs to differ. Zoe Weil, author and the founder of the Institute for Humane Education, argues that the obligation of education is to cultivate a generation of “solutionaries” – kind, just, and socially conscious people who will protect the environment and promote human rights. We talk about her new book, The World Becomes What We Teach, and touch upon educational equity issues like implicit bias, summer learning loss, the resurgence of school segregation, and how Common Core fits into her vision for meaningful change.”

Check out part one and part two of Zoe’s interviews online at Sea Change Radio. It’s a great listen!

This national placement is part of our comprehensive book publicity campaign, which includes a Radio Media Tour, for the Institute of Humane Education. Please contact Kathlene Carney to discuss how Carney & Associates publicity services can help promote your science or nature book or organization.

Science Friday Features Candid Creatures

UPDATE: Roland Kays also appeared on Science Friday’s radio program on May 6, 2016, reaching 1.5 million listeners on 374 public radio stations!

Today, NPR’s Science Friday posted an awesome article about our client’s book Candid Creatures. Here’s an excerpt from Julie Leibach’s clever piece. Be sure to check out her entire post for more, including a selection of our amazing photos:
CandidCreaturesCover“A new book of unabashed selfies has been released, but it reveals neither hide nor hair of a Kardashian. There is, however, plenty of hide and hair. Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature, by zoologist Roland Kays, is an album of wildlife photos captured with camera traps—devices that researchers install in the field to record members of the animal kingdom as they lope, scamper, or climb about their business. Kays’ book is also a rich summary of the insights that scientists have gained from using these tools.

“In essence, modern camera traps work like this: When a warm-blooded animal (or a reptile heated by the sun) walks in front of the device, an infrared motion-sensing component detects a change in heat signature, which triggers a digital camera to snap a photo. It’s then up to the researchers to recover the memory card containing the footage.

2.6.05Day-cougar“It’s kinda like Christmas every time you open the camera trap and get to see what pictures you get,” says Kays, a research associate professor at North Carolina State University and the director of the Biodiversity Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, who often uses camera traps in his work.

“Of course, there are millions of crappy pictures of animal butts,” he concedes, but when you hit upon a great shot of, say, a coyote in the middle of a frame, “you’re like, ah, that’s cool.” For Candid Creatures, Kays compiled what he calls the “greatest hits” of global camera trapping efforts, consisting of more than 600 photos from 153 research groups, including his own.”

This prestigious placement is part of our comprehensive book publicity campaign, which includes a Radio Media Tour, for Johns Hopkins University Press. Please contact Kathlene Carney to discuss how Carney & Associates publicity services can help promote your science or nature book or organization.

 

 

 

NPR memo discourages promotion of podcasts on member stations

In another example of old media vs. new media, NPR is discouraging its member stations from promoting NPR podcasts and the new NPR One app.

Nieman Lab broke the story last week. In a nutshell, “NPR can’t promote NPR One — the lauded, loved app that is basically the future of NPR — to what is literally the group of people that would be most interested in it, NPR radio listeners. NPR is investing substantially in developing podcasts — but it isn’t allowed to tell radio listeners where to find them or how they can listen to them.

“NPR is an entity based in Washington, D.C.; ‘public radio’ includes it, but also other radio distributors like PRI, APM, and PRX and, most importantly, the over 900 NPR member stations that dot the landscape. And these players don’t always have the same interests. A local station’s greatest asset is its connection to the local community, symbolized by the broadcast tower that, uniquely, lets it reach radio listeners in cars and homes. NPR’s greatest asset is the value its audience sees in its content and brand, which might be delivered via a radio signal, a website, a mobile app, or a podcast.

“This tension — between the local stations who pay the largest share of NPR’s bills and the network that sees a future beyond terrestrial radio signals — is basically everywhere you look in public radio. (NPR’s board is majority station managers, which is at the root of it all.) And it’s the right frame through which to view this new “ethics” policy from NPR. Here’s Chris Turpin, NPR’s vice president for news programming and operations:

As podcasts grow in number and popularity we are talking about them more often in our news programs. We are also fielding more and more questions from news staff and Member stations about our policies for referring to podcasts on air. To that end, we want to establish some common standards, especially for language in back announces. Our hope is to establish basic principles that are easy to understand and allow plenty of flexibility for creativity. These guidelines apply to all podcasts, whether produced by NPR or by other entities.

— No Call to Action: We won’t tell people to actively download a podcast or where to find them. No mentions of npr.org, iTunes, Stitcher, NPR One, etc.

GOOD: “That’s Linda Holmes of NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast and our blogger on the same subject and Bob Mondello, NPR’s film critic. Thanks so much.”

BAD: “OK, everyone. You can download Alt.Latino from iTunes and, of course, via the NPR One app.”

— Informational, not Promotional: When referring to podcasts, and the people who host, produce, or contribute to them, we will mention the name of the podcast but not in a way that explicitly endorses it. References should not specifically promote the content of the podcast (e.g., “This week, the Politics Podcast team digs into delegate math.”) If you feel a podcast title needs explaining (e.g. Hidden Brain), some additional language can be added (e.g., “That’s Shankar Vedantam, he hosts a podcast that explores the unseen patterns of human behavior. It’s called, Hidden Brain”). Just to repeat: Be creative in how you back announce podcasts, but please avoid outright promotion.

— No NPR One: For now, NPR One will not be promoted on the air.”

At Carney & Associates, we excel in radio media tours and have placed our clients on thousands of radio shows and podcasts. For a free consultation on how our publicity services can help promote your book, product or service, please contact Kathlene Carney.