Forbes Features Ara the Star Engineer

Many thanks to Amy Blankson for featuring Komal Singh, author of Ara the Star Engineer (Page Two Books), in her recent Forbes article about role models inspiring girls to study STEM.

“Having positive female STEM role models in mainstream media is a gift that has been decades in the making,” writes Amy.  “For women of Generation X and even part of the Millennial Generation, female role models in science were few and far between.”

With women only making up 25% of the STEM workforce, positive female role models are more important than ever. And not just for young professionals–a heartbreaking study shows that girls start doubting their STEM intelligence by age 6. Enter Komal:

Komal Singh, a program manager in engineering at Google and a mother of two . . . was shocked when her four-year-old daughter announced, “Engineers are boys!” Singh and fellow female Google engineers decided to volunteer their spare time to start changing this dynamic. They wrote Ara the Star Engineer, a first-of-its-kind picture book that features real-life engineering trailblazers from diverse backgrounds with the goal of inspiring girls and children of color to explore STEM.

The book inspires kids – especially girls and children of color – to explore STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) as it follows a 6-year old girl, Ara, on a quest to build an algorithm to solve a big problem.

During her adventure, Ara is helped by a diverse set of real-life women engineering leaders of color — a Tenacious Troubleshooter, Code Commander, Prolific Problem Solver, Intrepid Innovator. The book teaches basic problem solving & computer science concepts  in a whimsical manner along the way. Ara also includes an attached mini-booklet with a deeper tech dive, as well as online activity sheets with hands-on tech activities.

All profits from the book sales will be donated to charities encouraging women’s and girls’ participation in STEM fields. This book is not an official Google product but a grassroots, passion project of Google employees in their personal capacity striving for an equitable future for all girls.

 

Are you an author looking for a book publicist, an expert looking for a PR firm, or a small business in need of publicity? Whether you’re looking for a San Francisco book publicist or a national PR campaign, please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can contribute to your success.

The Once and Future Forest

In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of Save the Redwoods League, we are proud to be representing The Once and Future Forest: California’s Iconic Redwoods (Heyday, October 2018), a stunning book that showcases both the grandeur of the redwood ecosystems that sustain California and the deep love they have engendered in scientists, writers, artists and the general public.

 At the heart of this celebration are five new essays by Gary Ferguson, David Harris, Meg Lowman, Greg Sarris and David Rains Wallace. These pieces discuss a multitude of topics, including the fascinating science of redwoods, the League’s history of redwoods conservation and the big trees’ significance to indigenous cultures.

 What unites the essays, aside from their theme, is their sense of awe.

 “When mature and well stocked with four-hundred-year-olds,” writes Harris, “Redwood groves are typically canopied, casting the forest floor in perpetual shade and capturing an airy, cathedral emptiness between the bottom and the top. That enormous space—with patches of light filtering through its ceiling and drifting earthward like leaves on a stream—explains why a visit to an old-growth redwood grove, even in a park, is often considered a spiritual experience of the first order.” 

The essays and accompanying extraordinary photographs will inspire readers to protect these majestic beings and to look for a more ecologically informed future.

“In 1850, California was host to more than two million acres of full-fledged old-growth primeval sempervirens forest, including hundred-year-old juveniles, four-hundred-year-old adults, and thousand-year-old elders who had sprouted around the time the New Testament was being written,” Harris continues. “Then commenced some hundred and fifty years of cutting, sawing, and felling old-growth coast redwood. Today, a little more than a hundred thousand acres of virgin forest remains, merely 5 percent of old-growth sempervirens, and we are left––lining up at Muir Woods, Redwood Creek, Rockefeller Forest, and the Avenue of the Giants—to try to recognize and account for that which is now irretrievably diminished or lost to us, and to all our children from here on, or for at least a thousand years.”

 While today, under the direction of president and CEO Sam Hodder, Save the Redwoods League remains thoroughly committed to conservation, its work has blossomed to include the critical restoration of the extraordinary forests we have lost and the protection of the resilient landscape that has fostered these giants across millennia.

 “With the past at heart and our vision for the future of these forests in mind, we know that one hundred years is just the beginning of the League’s work to save the redwoods,” says Hodder. “The captivating essays gathered in this collection draw on history, science, inspiration, and identity to convey the remarkable story of redwoods in California, to offer a glimpse into their future, and to reflect the urgency of our vision to heal these forests and keep them on a path toward recovery and resilience.”

Steve Wasserman, publisher and executive director of Heyday added, “Heyday is honored to act as midwife to the birth of this remarkable book, a paean to the hundred-year effort by the Save the Redwoods League to preserve, cherish, and understand a sublime species whose palpable astonishments have bedazzled generations before us–and, we trust, generations to come.”

The Once and Future Forest is a luxurious objet d’art: protected by a foil-embossed slipcase, this oversized clothbound hardcover is constructed of premium materials and features over 175 full-color images. A percentage of its sales will go to support the League’s protection of the redwoods.

As California natives who grew up alongside the Coastal redwood forests, we are thrilled to be promoting this extraordinary book and its worthy cause.

Are you an author looking for a book publicist, an expert looking for a PR firm, or a small business in need of publicity? Whether you’re looking for a San Francisco book publicist or a national PR campaign, please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can contribute to your success.

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Growing a Better World with Money

Our awesome client Joel Solomon has made it his mission to save the planet, and humanity, with money.

Environmentalists are often unwilling to see wealth as a force for good. In a world where corporate greed has resulted in environmental destruction and financial inequality, some even see it as evil. But Joel explains that, “Money has no values of its own. Money doesn’t account for fairness, justice, or the well-being of the planet. That’s our role, and it’s more crucial than ever that we assume it.”

Joel is a pioneer in the emerging world of mission-driven finance and the author of The Clean Money Revolution: Reinventing Power, Purpose, and Capitalism. He’s also the chair of Renewal Funds, one of the largest mission venture capital firms in North America, investing $98 million in entrepreneurs with green businesses, inventions and social policies.

Joel was recently interviewed on the popular long-running radio show The Visionary Activist Show which airs on KPFA-FM, Berkeley, KPFK-FM, Los Angeles, KFCF-FM, Fresno, and many more stations. (This interview is one of many in our book publicity campaign for Joel’s new book.)

Host Caroline Casey said, “Let all good-hearted people release disdain for wealth, and be willing to direct its swoosh in the desirable direction, to irrigating our Best Dreams… transforming dread into dedication.”

“There’s more than enough money in the world to solve our problems. Whether you’re living paycheck to paycheck or a multimillionaire, there are steps we can all take right now.”

The clean money movement has already begun. Small businesses, entrepreneurs and consumers are increasingly using their money to make the world a better place, and Joel believes that we are on the cusp of one of the largest economic shifts in history . . . impact investing will decide the fate of our planet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you an expert looking for a publicist, a nonprofit looking for a PR firm, or a small business in need of publicity? Please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can contribute to your success.

Carney PR Book Publicity Tips

Our Mantras Featured in the Wall Street Journal

Friends and family know that I’m a big fan of affirmations, so I was happy for the opportunity to share one of my favorites for a recent Wall Street Journal article, “One Habit to Make You Happier Today.”

Mark Leary, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, repeatedly tells himself “I’m OK right now” when he’s worried about something in the future, such as the results of a medical test. Irwin Weinberg, a 69-year-old retired quality management consultant in Boca Raton, Fla., tells himself “QTL” (which stands for “Quality Time Left”) in difficult times, including when his wife was terminally ill last year, to remind himself not to waste time thinking about the negative and to focus on what makes him happy. Kathlene Carney, 55, a publicist in Point Richmond, Calif., begins repeating “good things always happen to me and good things always happen through me” as soon she feels a downward cycle of negative thinking coming on, whether it is prompted by work stress or worrying about global unrest.

The article by Elizabeth Bernstein includes a series of tips from psychologists and neuroscientists about how to create a mantra that will help lower cortisol levels and create new neural pathways in your brain. Our client Dr. Paul DePompo was among the experts quoted, offering this advice:

Make sure it is positive. But not unbelievable. “If it’s too positive, it can feel hokey—‘I’m good enough, smart enough and people like me,’” says Paul DePompo, a psychologist in Newport Beach, Calif. For example, telling yourself all is well when it clearly isn’t may not help. “Mantras that help build a healthy brain long-term are based in truth, logic and helpfulness,” Dr. DePompo says.

 

I highly encourage you to check out the entire article for excellent, simple advice about how to start improving your mood and mental well being starting today!

Are you looking for a publicist, a publicity firm for nonprofits, a PR firm for small business, or an independent book publicist? Carney & Associates specializes in personal development. Please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services and book publicity tips can contribute to your success.

Canada’s Largest Show Features Dr. Paul Blanc

Canada’s most-listened to radio show The Current featured a fascinating interview with Paul D. Blanc, M.D. today. Hosted by Anna Maria Tremonti, one of Canada’s most trusted journalists, The Current airs weekday mornings across their country over the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. (CBC), and is heard across the U.S. on SiriusXM.

Here’s an excerpt from their summary:

For well over a century, viscose rayon has been used to make clothes, tires, cellophane and everyday kitchen sponges.

It was hailed as a wondrous new product when first introduced — but what most people didn’t know is how deadly manufacturing rayon was for the factory workers.

It’s an industrial hazard whose egregious history ranks up there with asbestos, lead and mercury, according to author Paul Blanc.

In his new book Fake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon (published by Yale University Press), Blanc, who is also a University of California professor of medicine, looks at how the manufacturing of viscose rayon served as a death sentence for many industry workers.

“There was a famous rubber factory where they put bars on the second story windows because so many workers had a tendency to jump out and kill themselves,” he tells The Current’s guest host Laura Lynch.

The key ingredient in the making of viscose is a molecule called carbon disulfide — a molecule so insidiously toxic that it devastated the minds and bodies of factory workers for more than a century.

Blanc says that occupational health and multinational corporations were aware of the dangers, but motivated by huge profits, failed to act.

“It was pretty easy to recognize the toxic effects early on because it makes workers insane. They found that about 30 per cent of the workers that they investigated showed signs of serious poisoning.”

But when it comes to the health impact on consumers, Blanc says there is none.

“Which is why … it’s gone on as long. Because when consumers aren’t affected, there’s not very much impetus for outrage if it’s just the poor people making it that suffer.”

Blanc says the fabric continues to this day to be “greenwashed” as an eco-friendly product.

“They omit entirely the fact that you can’t make the product without this toxic chemical. So it’s really a ‘greenwashing’ of the most diabolical sort.”

Listen to the full conversation HERE.

This interview is part of our comprehensive publicity campaign for Fake Silk. Are you looking for a publicist, a publicity firm for nonprofits, a PR firm for small business, or an independent book publicist? Carney & Associates specializes in science pr and sustainability topics. Please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can contribute to your success.

 

The Atlantic Features “Fake Silk”

In The Atlantic, James Hamblin recently wrote a fascinating feature about FAKE SILK: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon by Paul David Blanc, M.D.

Here’s an excerpt from “The Buried Story of Male Hysteria: When men actually began to be diagnosed as ‘hysterics,’ doctors searched for a cause. They found a chemical that may be on the rise again today.”

When a raving 27-year-old man was committed to Hudson River State Hospital for the Insane in April of 1887, no one thought much of it.

But 12 days later, another man arrived at the door in much the same incoherent condition. When the men regained awareness and could be interrogated, it turned out that they worked in the same nearby rubber factory.

That summer, a third man was brought to the hospital, where he was described as “in a condition of great mental excitement, disturbing the neighborhood by loud noises and violent praying.” He, too, turned out to be a co-worker.

The chief of the Nervous Department at New York’s College of Physicians and Surgeons at the time was Frederick Peterson. He knew these three cases couldn’t be a coincidence, so he set out interrogating the workers on the nature of their jobs. As he suspected, the men had all inhaled a chemical in the factory’s air: carbon disulfide.

Peterson had heard of carbon-disulfide insanity in Europe, so he alerted his colleagues in The Boston Medical and Surgical Journal (now known as The New England Journal of Medicine) that the problem had come to America. In England, the new term “gassed” had arisen, defined in the Liverpool Daily Post as “the term used in the India rubber business, and it meant dazed.” The British physician Thomas Oliver had recalled watching as people working in rubber factories left after their shifts and “simply staggered home,” apart from themselves. The effect could be deadly. “Some of them have become the victims of acute insanity,” Oliver wrote, “and in their frenzy have precipitated themselves from the top rooms of the factory to the ground.”

This article is part of our comprehensive publicity campaign for Fake Silk. Are you looking for a publicist, a publicity firm for nonprofits, a PR firm for small business, or an independent book publicist? Carney & Associates specializes in science pr and sustainability topics. Please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can contribute to your success.

Donald Trump and the media’s ‘epic fail’

There’s been a lot of reporting about the media’s “epic fail” in the recent election, and one of the most insightful articles is by The Bureau of Investigative Journalism:

One of the most egregious failings of the media in the US election was their chase of audience share at the expense of substantial reporting. Struggling with ever-declining advertising revenues, newspapers chased the stories that brought them the clicks.

At the heart of divided societies in both the US and Britain is a newspaper industry in precipitous decline. The true “epic fail” is of the journalism industry as a whole: that the sector has been unable to find an alternative commercial model to the one that has sustained it for so long. As print readers migrate online, few newspapers have been able to persuade them to continue contributing to the cost of producing news; and neither have they been able to convince advertisers that their online versions are as worthy of investment as their print products.

The article also referenced  the shocking reduction in journalists in the U.S. As reported in The Guardian, the number of people employed in the US newspaper industry has fallen by almost 60% since the dawn of the internet age – from nearly 458,000 in 1990 to about 183,000 in 2016. This loss has been felt most seriously among regional papers which have either cut their newsrooms back to the bone or shut down altogether.

Major media platforms did fly their own journalists around the country to interview supporters at Trump rallies, but these reporters “rarely got out of the campaign bubbles. They had not lived among the many communities that voted for Trump” the way local journalists had–before their jobs went away.

Based in London, the Bureau of Investigative Journalism understands the important role investigative journalism must play in the years to come. “Now more than ever, we need strong, independent, fearless and deep reporting that holds power to account. We need journalists who have the time and the resources to properly investigate the stories that matter.”

It’s now more urgent than ever that we support the legitimate sources that provide our news. Those journalists can’t work for free.

Meanwhile, are you looking for a publicist, a publicity firm for nonprofits, a PR firm for small business, or an independent book publicist? Please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can contribute to your success–through reputable news outlets.

 

Greenwashed products exposed on Groks Science Radio Show

The current “greenwashing” of viscose products as being eco-friendly (rayon fabrics, sponges, cellophane products) is exposed in FAKE SILK: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon by Paul D. Blanc, M.D. (Yale University Press).

A highly toxic chemical, carbon disulfide, has been the life blood of this industry from the start. It also has meant a death sentence for many of its workers. For a more than a century, making viscose has been linked to severe illness, including mental derangement, heart attack, and stroke.

Dr. Blanc discusses the history of the industry and its current rebirth in greenwashed eco-friendly products on the Groks Science Show. He emphasizes the importance of skepticism about “green” products on the market, not just in terms of potential hazards for consumers, but also up the chain in its manufacturing, and where it goes after the consumer is finished with it.

This interview is part of our comprehensive publicity campaign for Fake Silk. Are you looking for a publicist, a publicity firm for nonprofits, a PR firm for small business, or an independent book publicist? Please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can contribute to your success.

 

CJR: Tips for Journalists Covering Trump

“The Canadian media now knows how to report on a post-truth, journalist-bashing politician, and they have some ideas for their American counterparts struggling to keep up with Trump,” according to a fascinating article in  the Columbia Journalism Review.

In “Canadian Journalists Who Covered Rob Ford Offer Tips on Trump,” their first piece of advice is that visuals speak louder than words:

No one knows that better than Robyn Doolittle, the now Globe and Mail reporter who was one of two Toronto Star journalists to see the infamous Ford crack-cocaine video. She was only allowed to watch the video on an iPhone in the back seat of a parked car—she couldn’t take pictures or the video with her. While that seemed good enough at the time, when the story came out thousands of Torontonians, including Ford and other city counsellors, said it was fake. “I was shocked that the half the city would think that the Toronto Star made up the story,” she says.

About a year later, now at the Globe and Mail, another drug dealer called saying he had a second video of Ford smoking crack. Once again, she could only watch the video on a mobile phone, but unlike with the first video, her paper agreed to pay $10,000 for several screenshots. When the story came out the next day, Ford checked himself into rehab, something he had never done before. “I have a newfound appreciation for photos,” she says. “In the days of Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, people expect to see footage.”

The article also advises journalists to start standing up for themselves, and emphasizes the importance of support from news agencies.

It’s also critical for reporters to know their editors and their newspapers will be there to defend them, says Irene Gentle, managing editor at the Toronto Star. “Reporters have to believe they will be supported despite the attacks on them personally, despite the attacks on the integrity of the news organization and the news industry,” she says. “The editor has to make that completely clear. The reporters have to know their job is to keep going.”

At Carney & Associates, we’ve specialized in working with journalists for more than 20 years, and it’s our job to remain abreast of the monumental changes that are reshaping today’s media landscape.

Now it’s more urgent than ever that we support legitimate sources that provide our news. Journalists can’t work for free, more on this in future posts…

Meanwhile, are you looking for a publicist, a publicity firm for nonprofits, a PR firm for small business, or an independent book publicist? Please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can contribute to your success–through reputable news outlets.

 

TriplePundit: Renewables Disrupting Fossil Fuels

Energy expert Leah Parks says renewable energy technologies are poised to disrupt fossil fuels, in an insightful article published recently on TriplePundit. Here’s a short excerpt:

“Exponential growth clean-energy technologies are a most powerful not-so-secret weapon for our last, best effort in the fight against disastrous climate change. A 21st-century energy transformation is already underway.  Our digital revolution is facilitating massive progress in technologies that are leading to disruption and will result in the replacement of the fossil fuel industry faster than most could imagine.

“We can jump over political resistance and climate denial despite outdated and misinformed all-of-the above federal policies.  Our modern-day Edisons have done their job.  We are at a tipping point where technological innovations that have been in development for many years can now provide us with all the energy we need at ever decreasing costs.”

“We need only look at the last turn of the century to see how quickly transformation can happen.

“In 1903 we took our first flight, and New York city streets were filled with buggies.  By 1914 we were fighting a war in the air and the same streets teemed with cars.  The engineering which first made spaceflight possible was developed in 1919.  Within 38 years Sputnik was launched, and 12 years later we walked on the moon.

“We can jump over political resistance and climate denial despite outdated and misinformed all-of-the above federal policies.  Our modern-day Edisons have done their job.  We are at a tipping point where technological innovations that have been in development for many years can now provide us with all the energy we need at ever decreasing costs.”

“We need only look at the last turn of the century to see how quickly transformation can happen.

“In 1903 we took our first flight, and New York city streets were filled with buggies.  By 1914 we were fighting a war in the air and the same streets teemed with cars.  The engineering which first made spaceflight possible was developed in 1919.  Within 38 years Sputnik was launched, and 12 years later we walked on the moon.

“The exact form our energy infrastructure will take by the year 2050 is not certain, but it will be cleaner, cheaper and safer than the one we inherited from the 20th century. Electric vehicles and trains, as well as heat pumps, will play a major role.  Solar, wind and storage, paired with digital management and energy efficiency, are already being deployed.

“We are witnessing the end of an energy dinosaur.  This is a new era of clean energy, ready to obtain its fuel free of charge from the sun and wind.  Anyone looking backward will be left in the digital dust.  They will be made extinct by the unrelenting disruptive force of exponential growth technologies.

“Working against entrenched interests can be frustrating and at times make optimism difficult.  In moments of doubt, let’s not forget the words of Robert Hutchings Goddard, the father of space flight, ‘The dream of yesterday is the hope of todayand the reality of tomorrow.'”

book3d2This placement is one of many in our publicity campaign for Parks’ new book All-Electric America: A Climate Solution and the Hopeful Future.” Are you looking for a publicist, a publicity firm for nonprofits, a PR firm for small business, or an independent book publicist? Please contact Kathlene Carney for a free consultation to find out how our publicity services can drive your success.